Faculty

April 6, 2021

A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) led by Molly McCue, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM, associate dean for research and professor in the Department of Veterinary Population Medicine at the CVM, recently received nearly $60,000 from the Morris Animal Foundation to investigate the genetic risks for equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). PPID is common in older horses and poses significant morbidity and mortality rates.

March 22, 2021

In the United States, approximately 12,000 patients present with glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain or spinal cord cancer, each year. Glioblastoma has no cure and a median survival period of 15-18 months. Gliomas are very difficult to remove entirely with surgery because of their highly invasive growth and require a second line of attack.

March 22, 2021

As another touchpoint in a lasting relationship between the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) and the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, a team of CVM researchers led by Tiffany Wolf, DVM, PhD, recently received more than $70,000 from project led by Seth Moore, PhD, director of biology and environment at the Grand Portage Band, to continue assisting the tribal nation in investigating moose habitat and population health in a changing climate.

March 19, 2021

A live recombinant Pichinde virus (PICV) vector vaccine is safe and effective against turkey arthritis reovirus (TARV), according to a recent study led by Sunil Mor, BVSc & AH, MVSc, PhD, and Hinh Ly, PhD. Vaccination may be an effective way to reduce lameness induced by TARV in flocks, but there are currently no commercial TARV vaccines available.

March 15, 2021

Mild gastrointestinal erosions are more common in dogs treated with anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) over a long period of time than in control dogs with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disease, according to a recent study led by Tracy Hill, DVM, DACVIM, PhD, DECVIM. NSAIDs are the pharmaceutical most associated with gastroduodenal ulceration and perforation in dogs. However, the prevalence of GI injury associated with chronic use of NSAIDs in dogs is unknown.

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