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As the dairy industry looks to reduce antibiotic use, dairy farmers have partnered with researchers to look at the common practice of administering antimicrobials to cows with intramammary udder infections at the end of lactation. This practice, known as dry cow therapy, is a large contributor to antibiotic use on dairy farms. Researchers from the University of Minnesota collected samples from 80 herds from 10 dairy states to determine the different types of bacteria causing intramammary infections at dry off.

Scientists respond to call from state legislators to roll out translated resources and customized educational programming for Minnesota’s many cultural contexts.

Recent research into antibodies may lead to more effective vaccinations and treatments for devastating viral infections. 

The udder health of milk-producing cows is a primary concern for dairy farmers. Bacteria found on many surfaces in the milking parlor on dairy farms contribute to mastitis, an udder infection that directly affects a cow’s welfare, milk quality, and yield, as well as a producer’s economic returns. A recent study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine examined how bacteria on cloth towels used to prepare udders for milking may contribute to these impactful infections.

New multilingual outreach events and materials have been released around chronic wasting disease (CWD). Fact sheets are now available in Korean, Khmer, and Hmong languages to reach those Minnesota hunting communities, along with special communications materials tailored to the Amish community in southeast Minnesota. This joint initiative was developed by the Minnesota Center for Prion Research and Outreach and the Center for Animal Health and Food Safety, and requested by Minnesota state legislators and multilingual community members. 

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Press contact

Martin Moen
Director of Advancement
Phone: 612-624-2268
Email: mmoen@umn.edu

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