Kevin Lang, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences

Kevin Lang

Contact Info

[email protected]

Office Phone 612-624-9267

Office Address:
205 Veterinary Science Building

Mailing Address:
1971 Commonwealth Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55108

Postdoctoral Fellow, Houra Merrikh's Lab, Vanderbilt University

PhD, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN

B.S. Microbiology, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN

Summary

The Lang Lab is focused on understanding how core biological processes, such as DNA replication, transcription, and translation, are affected during host-pathogen interactions. We use a multi-disciplinary approach including genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, proteomics, and genomics to answer fundamental questions about the biology of living cells.

Expertise

Host-pathogen interactions, bacteriology, DNA replication, DNA repair

Awards & Recognition

Richard Armstrong Faculty Transition Award                    2021
Department of Biochemistry
Vanderbilt University

NIH F32 Ruth L. Kirschstein Postdoctoral Fellowship      2019-2020

NIH T32 Bacterial Pathogenesis Training Grant                2018

USDA AFRI NIFA Fellowship                                                  2013-2015

Research

Publications

For a complete list of publications, please visit Google Scholar

Kevin S. Lang and H. Merrikh. (2021) Topological stress is responsible for the detrimental outcomes of head-on replication-transcription conflicts. Cell Reports 34(9), 108797.

D. Ma, Z. Wang, C.N. Merrikh, Kevin S. Lang, P. Lu, X. Li, H. Merrikh, Z. Rao, and W. Xu. (2018) Crystal structure of a membrane-bound O-acyltransferase. Nature 562(7726):286-290

Kevin S. Lang and H. Merrikh. (2018) The clash of macromolecular titans: replication-transcription conflicts in bacteria. Annual reviews Microbiology 72: 71-88.

Kevin S. Lang*, A.N. Hall*, C.N. Merrikh, M. Ragheb H. Tabakh, A.J. Pollack, J.J. Woodward, J.E. Dreifus and H. Merrikh. (2017) Replication-transcription conflicts generate R-loops that orchestrate bacterial stress survival and pathogenesis. Cell 170(4): 787-799.e18. *Equal contribution. F1000 recommended.