• Standing CT scan at Leatherdale Equine Center

    Philanthropic support gives Leatherdale Equine Center new standing CT and NICU

    These new additions, made possible by a generous gift from Louise Leatherdale, will elevate the level of care offered by LEC on multiple levels.

  • porcine virus image

    New $3 million grant helps researchers tackle porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    University of Minnesota scientists are collaborating to look at how PRRS virus evolves to understand disease spread, and advance mitigation and control efforts.

  • Deer in the woods with CWD Watch logo in bottom left corner

    CWD outbreak and research calls for new educational resources

    Center for Animal Health and Food Safety launches online tool for tracking and understanding recent chronic wasting disease research.

We are dedicated to improving the health and well-being of animals and people, and strengthening Minnesota's economy, by providing high-quality education, conducting leading-edge research, and delivering innovative veterinary services.

Connect with us:

Learn with us

A College of Veterinary Medicine degree prepares you for success in the dynamic veterinary medical field. 

Current news

Four University of Minnesota alumni, faculty, and research partners have been named recipients of Point of Pride Research Day awards. All awards are based on set criteria, and honor faculty and alumni who show outstanding work in their field.

Noelle Noyes, DVM, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, is working to overcome antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by collaborating with researchers at Colorado State University, University of Florida, and Texas A&M University to identify a faster way of identifying AMR genes with novel variations.

Hemorrhagic fevers are caused by viruses, such as Ebola virus, yellow fever virus, and Lassa virus, which are transmitted from rodents or insects to humans. They can cause severe bleeding disorders. Except for yellow fever virus, there are currently no existing FDA-approved drugs or vaccines against these deadly human pathogens.

Pages